behind the scenes


Welcome and thanks for your interest in the Initiative for Moderate Economic Behavior. 

 

When we, a small group of friends, were students at the German universities of Mannheim and Frankfurt we regularly came together for a loose discussion circle on issues that were both relevant for our disciplines - economics and political science - and for the challenges of our time. One of our major topics was the question of economic growth and overconsumption in the light of climate change, a growing world population and a rising number of people claiming their share in global wealth. And we had some controversial debates. Will the gains in economic productivity and technological efficieny outpace growing economic demands? Is the relation between global warming and economic growth as obvious as it appears to be? We agreed, however, on two points. First, that many people especially in the wealthy parts of the world are fairly unmindful of the consequences of their consumption patterns and economic demands. Second, that individual liberty comes with a responsibility to think about exactly that.

 

Taking these insights up, in 2015 some of us decided to put together a website and use it as an archive for own thoughts and as a source of information for the world out there. It shall give people food for thought to keep the discussion about personal economic demands going. The idea was that our academically-informed yet easygoing discussions could somehow transcend our intimate circle and actually make a difference - as small as it may be. So, here we are . 

 

For further questions feel free to contact us at contact@imeb.org.

 

 

 

News

September 2015 Have a look at this new documentary: "Landraub" by Kurt Langbein.

July 2015 A new study of the effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions is published in Science. The lesson is clear: The oceans have reached their limit to withstand man-made climate change.

June 2015 The new documentary THE TRUE COST looks behind the concept of fast fashion. Director Andrew Morgan follows the exploited Bangladeshi garment worker Shima Akther who can see her little son only once a year.

The movie shows the abyss of ignorance of Western shoppers towards the lives of those who produce their cheap clothes.

You may want to look here.